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last updated:04/03/2019 @ 12:15 pm
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Elements of revalidation


Preparing for revalidation


Since the inception of revalidation all the Medical Royal Colleges and Faculties have worked with the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) and General Medical Council (GMC) to provide generic guidance on the supporting information required by all doctors for appraisal and revalidation.

This AoMRC and GMC issued updated guidance in 2018 which is available in the two documents from the GMC and the AoMRC. OHPs connected to the Faculty for revalidation should understand that these documents form the basis of the RO’s expectations for revalidation


Six types of information to discuss and collect for appraisal


There are six types of supporting information that you will be expected to provide and discuss at your annual appraisal although some need only be presented once in each five year cycle.

They are:

  • Continuing professional development (evidence of this should be provided annually, for discussion at appraisal)
  • Quality improvement activity (the frequency of this depends upon what type of quality improvement activity you undertake and should be discussed with your appraiser)
  • Significant events (these should be logged annually, for discussion at appraisal)
  • Feedback from colleagues (this should take place at least once during the revalidation cycle and before your first revalidation date)
  • Feedback from patients (where applicable, this should also take place at least once during the revalidation cycle and before your first revalidation date)
  • Review of complaints and compliments (these should be logged annually, for discussion at appraisal)

By providing all six types of supporting information over the revalidation cycle you should, through reflection and discussion at your appraisal have demonstrated your practice against all the domains and attributes of Good Medical Practice. This will make it easier for your appraiser to complete your appraisal summary, as your appraisal summary is structured around the four domains.


It is the quality not the quantity of supporting information which counts!


You should select your supporting information carefully. It is the quality of the supporting information, its value, your reflection and how it has influenced your practice, which is important, and what the appraiser and RO will want to see.